A Contemporary Curation: The Paradox of Creation

As a new, new media scholar, I would like to focus on what intrigues me the most about new media, and what makes it successful. That is,  the different ways in which participatory culture happens. While contributions to new media have no guidelines, there seem to be two very distinct categories. I will spend my time explaining, depicting and comparing the traditional creator vs. the contemporary curator in an attempt to address what I will call the “paradox of creation” while asking, is there such a thing as new media creation?

If not, where lies the future of new media? Will the political argument of creation vs curation always exist? Will curation become the “norm” ?

First, I would like to provide my stance on each subject. For the very reason that I believe curation is creation I will define and label the topics as follows:

Traditional creation: “new” unexplored media that is not based off of another’s work in any way shape or form.

Contemporary curation: “new” previously explored media that has been shown in a different light, with a new message.

There are two further distinctions that can be made for contemporary curation. First, there is conscious curation where the curator is intentionally taking another’s work and making it their own (Girl talk). Second, is influential curation where past experiences are the reason for the curator’s work.

EVERYTHING IS A REMIX

This video shows an example of conscious curation.  Each song played was arguably different, with fundamentally the same rhythm.  Curations such as these have deeper value as songs than their melodies — while even they are quite different themselves.  A song’s value is a compilation of its melody, structure, portrayal and meaning, not any one single category.

BASIC DERIVATIVE RULES

This video portrays influential curation through the conceptual application of an idea. It is for this reason that creation must be defined as curation.  Every teacher explaining this subject is taking the existing idea and portraying it in their own words. All teachers are influenced by their teachings, when teaching.

40 YEARS CELL PHONE EVOLUTION

This video indirectly represents the paradox of creation.  In order for something to be “fairly created”, it must be original. Well, here’s an example of an idea that was created several times over, by just redesigning and advancing its composure. Every new cell phone coming out is not an original idea, just a better version.  Originality must focus on a work’s composition, not individual parts.

The Future?

Creation Curation

To rip and share a clip without remixing it is in fact to state its value. It is good enough already; it does not need to be enhanced—at least not for the moment. The old maxim holds true on the web: “Plagiarism is the sincerest form of flattery”. (Fagerjord)

Our culture no longer bothers to use words like appropriation or borrowing to describe those very activities. Today’s audience isn’t listening at all – it’s participating. Indeed, audience is as antique a term as record, the one archaically passive, the other archaically physical. The record, not the remix, is the anomaly today. The remix is the very nature of the digital. (Gibson, 2005)

Fagerjord, Anders. “Beyond Convergence.” After Convergence: YouTube and Remix Culture. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 187-200. Print.

Gibson, W. (2005). God’s little toys. Wired, 13.7.

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A Contemporary Curation: The Paradox of Creation

The Paradox of Creation in New Media

As a new, new media scholar, I would like to focus on what intrigues me the most about new media, and what makes it successful. That is,  the different ways in which participatory culture happens. While contributions to new media have no guidelines, there seem to be two very distinct categories. I will spend my time explaining, depicting and comparing the traditional creator vs. the contemporary curator in an attempt to address what I will call the “paradox of creation” while asking, is there such a thing as new media creation?

If not, where lies the future of new media? Will the political argument of creation vs curation always exist? Will curation become the “norm” ?

First, I would like to provide my stance on each subject. For the very reason that I believe curation is a variation of creation I will define and label the topics as follows:

Traditional creation: “new” unexplored media that is not based off of another’s work in any way shape or form.

Contemporary curation: “new” previously explored media that has been shown in a different light, with a new message.

There are two further distinctions that can be made for contemporary curation. First, there is conscious curation where the curator is intentionally taking another’s work and making it their own (Girl talk). Second, is influential curation where past experiences are the reason for the curator’s work.

I will explore YouTube and create a curation of videos that show the paradox of creation.

The decision, does traditional creation exist, is ultimately left up for you to decide.

The Paradox of Creation in New Media

Social Media Round Up

I have to be honest, taking this course was not my idea, it was my advisor’s. I was all about taking computer science classes, and anything else seemed like a burden.  That was a very closed minded way of thinking. Looking back, it was and is my favorite class.

To me, this alone proves how much I have grown as a person.  I have learned that I can better myself and take something away from everything I experience.

Referring to my first blog assignment “THE SOCIAL NETWORK – “THE BREAK UP SCENE”, I learned that the media we watch, (videos, short films, commercials, movies, etc.,) has meaning in every single facet of it’s make up.

For example, when analyzing the break up scene, there was not one piece of it that was put there “just because”.  Every single little thing has a meaning, and observing that meaning gives us the desired perception of the work by it’s creator. If you watch something just one time, you did not pick up on every literary element that was used. I had to watch that scene several times, and I’m sure that there are still parts I haven’t fully understood or analyzed.

This experience opened my eyes to being a more well rounded student and critical thinker.  There is always more than meets the eye, at least at first.

In my “JENKINS ANALYSIS – WEB 2.0” blog post, I learned just how important it is to step back and always question what it is that I’m being told.

This class has changed my perception of new media. It showed me that in this new wave of technology and innovation, we the people have become part of a collaborative participatory culture, and we must carefully use this to our a advantage. Not only must we question the validity of what we are reading, but also who is coming from. This experience has allowed me to grow as a new media scholar, for I certainly wasn’t one before.

All in all, taking this course has left me less afraid to step outside of my comfort zone. Taking classes that are unrelated to my major has gone from being a pain to a desire. I know that I can get just as much out of any class I take, and EVERYBODY needs to come to that realization at some point or another.

After all, we all want to be jacks of all trades, right?

Social Media Round Up

Remix Group Project

What is remix?

A remix is a piece of media which has been altered from its original state by adding removing or changing pieces of the item.  All forms of media, from movies to music, qualify to be remixed.  A good remix pulls together two seemingly unrelated materials, and creates a unique piece with a new meaning. 

ADmented Reality – Google Glasses Remixed with Google Ads

This video is a good example of a remix that uses satire.

[satire: the use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues.]

Everybody who uses Google search engine knows that they bombard you with ads.  Except they aren’t just ads, they are all ads based off of your searching history (Google owns YouTube too).  In Google’s commercial for their new product they show the conveniences Google Glass have to offer.

This video shows an exaggerated, potential side to Google Glass that Google certainly never brought up in their commercial. Who know’s if your experience with Google Glass will actually include annoying pop ups, but its scary to think that Google will have information regarding the things you physically observe, including for how long and when.

THE LION KING RISES: (Original) Dark Knight Rises Trailer Parody

This example of a remix depicts the mixing of audio from one movie and the visual aspect of another. This video maker took the audio of The Dark Knight Rises trailer and added footage from the Disney classic, The Lion King. In this way, they are using only audio to change the plot of a well-known movie and to create something unexpected. Through proper editing and audio syncing you can take things that would normally never be associated with each other and remix it in a way that make sense. What makes this particular video effective is the excellent editing as well as the knowledge that by mixing two very well-known movies most of the people watching the video will know what is going on. It’s also interesting the roles they chose to mix for each character; Simba has the lines of Bruce Wayne, Nala the voice of Selena Kyle, and Scar the voice of Bane. They matched the male leads, female leads, and the main villains. One comment on the video noted the comparison to the story lines of both movies. It brings up the ideas that although they have completely different story lines, both have the same formula/elements that make it easy to see the connection when one creates a remix.

Mrs. Doubtfire Trailer Recut – Horror Film

Mrs. Doubtfire is a movie that would usually catch the attention of family’s. After watching this remix of the movie Mrs. Doubtfire it went from a family movie to a horror movie and it changed the whole aspect of it. If you have ever seen this movie before you would know that it wasn’t made to be a horror movie but this remix somehow makes it work,  the way this person that made the remix changed the whole format of it made it something that no one ever could think of. I think the reason that this remix was successful is because no one would image it to turn out this way and it just shows how movies and or TV shows can really turn into anything you want them to with just a little imagination and thought.

Remix Group Project

Blog Post #9

The scene I would like to analyze is at 50m 42s.

Here Rick Cairns, a music industry lobbyist, is shown lecturing a group of adolescents about intellectual property; the property of somebody’s mind.  Rick threatens these kids with big words and large numbers in an attempt to discourage them from downloading music off of the internet.

Its to no surprise that when the camera pans onto the kids’ faces that they are scowling.  Its widely known that nearly EVERYONE downloads songs without paying, I know I certainly do.

But I do agree with the fact that stealing an artists’ work provides solid ground for an argument. The video goes on to show several people who all have lost large sums of money in lawsuits for this very reason.  During the compilation of faces telling their story, we hear that up to $150,000 can be charged PER song, while not a single penny reaches the hands of the artists being defended.

Here enlies the biggest problem, that the music industry is run by money hungry record labels. I think we can all agree that successful artists aren’t hurting for their money.  Most venues make an artist upwards of hundreds of thousands of dollars.  This leaves .99 cent songs on iTunes a pretty petty contribution to an artist, when they only receive about %9 of these earnings.

How in the world can a $10 compilation of songs turn into a $200,000 lawsuit?

This isn’t a just response. A fair penalty would be paying what the songs are worth.

 

 

Blog Post #9

Blog Post 8

EVERYTHING IS A REMIX


 REMIX: TO COMBINE OR EDIT EXISTING MATERIALS TO PRODUCE 
        SOMETHING NEW.

I had never given enough thought to realize that several of the things, ideas, and even people around us are nothing but spinoffs of something that once existed.  Typically, that something was successful, giving it reason to be emulated.

Who would’ve guessed Daft Punk is linked to Rapper’s Delight?  I certainly never considered Led Zeppelin a knockoff band, but their lack of uniqueness coupled with their copying of other works may lead one to believe so.

However, the limit on legal copying exists fairly high on the scale of plagiarism, simply because there are only so many ways to portray a point.  Consider that new generations will always have a new way of learning, and its imperative that they learn the same lessons prior generations did.

It is to no surprise to me that 74 out of the last 100 highest grossing films over the last 10 decades are sequels or based off a preexisting movie.  First, a story never has to end.  It could be told over a lifetime, not just a 3 hour segment.  It is for this reason that several movies can “piggy back” off one another, picking up where the other left off.

Plus, its important to consider this from a marketing standpoint.  There is more money in 10 movie productions than just one long one.

My best explanation for everything being a remix, is that the sample set that exists for us to chose from is not infinite, it is limited.  Think back to the first idea that was thought. It certainly didn’t have anything to do with the world we live in today, but it consisted of what DID exist.  Then, consider the second idea to be thought.  This thought was comprised of everything the first thought was, INCLUDING that first thought itself.  If you can imagine this, you’ll soon realize that the basis for every thought there on out was formed from everything before it, or at least bits and pieces.

Originality was once much easier to accomplish.  Now, with billions of people on the planet, it has become increasingly difficult to create a genuinely different concept.

But that won’t stop us from trying.

 

Blog Post 8

YouTube: A Place to Learn

YouTube: Gaining your Independence 

For this project, I decided to focus heavily on how YouTube personally effects me, and what makes it so beneficial in my life. In particular, using YouTube as an environment to learn on, and become self-sufficient.  

THESIS: 
YouTube provides the framework to become self-sufficient. Independence is achieved through participating, critiquing, and learning. 

YouTube; a place for fun

YouTube, unique to most social media sites, permits users to post, view and comment on videos.  These videos range across a very broad spectrum.  Some for entertainment, some for business, documentary, and most importantly for learning.

YouTube is a social media platform that is by far still in it’s infancy.  On February 14th, 2005, YouTube launched for the very first time.  Since, YouTube has snowballed into a platform harboring more than one billion users.

Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 3.46.02 PM

[ABOVE: Visual of one billion pennies]

YouTube; a place to participate

The famous notion of participatory culture originates from the father of social media, Henry Jenkins.  Jenkins stresses that we live in an age in which the focus is shifting between old media and new media.  Participatory culture is exactly as it sounds; collaboration among society.  Jenkins argues that new media platforms such as social media, are a compilation of US as a whole, and WE make up our media (Jenkins).

With over one billion users, YouTube relies entirely on participatory culture.  With such expansive depth, the outcome is variety.  With variety comes choice.

YouTube; a place to critique

Howard Rheingold discusses the idea of “crap-detection”.  With participatory culture giving us so much to choose from, we must make that choice carefully.  If there are 40 videos on a particular topic, it is likely some are more credible than others.  However, it is ultimately up to us to decide. Rheingold carefully warns us against the dangers of blindly following advice (Rheingold).

YouTube; a place to learn

YouTube is becoming incorporated into the classroom.  Sloane Burke argues that YouTube has the potential to be a scholarly learning tool for students.  In a 2011 study, it was found that 80% of classrooms in the United States have incorporated YouTube as a means of learning.

Once we have performed research, and detected any potential crap, we can learn.

YouTube; a place for independence

Becoming self-sufficient in this world is a trait that will not only grow you as an individual, but can also save you money!  Coupling a platform such as YouTube, with careful research tactics, daunting tasks can become very simple.  Consider your next oil change, or even building a website.  The more you know how to do, the less you have to rely on others.

A more informed society is a more successful one.

Here are some of the areas you can explore to broaden your knowledge on YouTube:

How to Make Your YouTube Videos More Popular 

Thats right, theres even tutorials on how to make popular YouTube videos! This video gives us ten basic tips to the best YouTube videos. [45s-55s]

How to Wash Your Hands in Space

This may not be the most practical “how-to” video, but it’s certainly entertaining enough.  Learning isn’t necessarily about importance, but expanding what you know. [40s-1m]

How to Perform CPR

This may be my favorite type of DIY video.  Videos like this, prove just how important it is to take it upon yourself to learn things.  You CAN pay for a CPR class, or dedicate a few minutes out of your day to see this tutorial for free.  [1m-1m20s]

The Power Rule

YouTube math tutorials were how I passed calc II at RPI.  The beauty of YouTube is that more than likely, every area of study has been covered.  Therefore, you can re-learn, sometimes in a different way, assignments. 

 

Cited links:

http://ijahsp.nova.edu/articles/Vol7Num1/pdf/Burke.pdf?q=youtube-not-workin g

http://rheingold.com/2013/crap-detection-mini-course /

http://video.mit.edu/watch/what-is-participatory-culture-3027/ PARTICIPATOR Y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gPm-c1wRs Q

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/edtech-news-and-trends/survey-says-80-percent-of-faculty-use-social-media-in-their-teaching /

YouTube: A Place to Learn